praha.eu | magistrat.praha.eu | pis.cz
This content requires Adobe Flash Player and a browser with JavaScript enabled.
Built on Flash Panorama Player.

THE SQUARE OF 25TH MARCH

Cakovice - Prague 9

GPS: 50°9'6.12"N, 14°31'26.04"E

Čakovice was joined to the capital of Prague on 1st January 1968. Until that time, it belonged to the district of Prague – east, within administration. The Square of 25th March has been named like this in memory of destructive air attack by the American planes, just on that day in 1945, in the very end of the World War II. Goal of the air attack was to destroy industrial plants in the north of Prague, especially in Vysočany and Libeň. Sunday was chosen as the day so that there were as few human victims as possible. However, this intention did not turn well. Besides huge material losses, several inhabitants died not only in Vysočany and Libeň but also in Kbely, Čakovice, Satalice and Vinoř.

The main building in each town and city is a town hall. Town hall in Čakovice, properly repaired, has no. 121, and it is standing in the western part of the Square of 25th March. Originally, it was built in 1890 as a nursery for children of employees of the local large sugar factory. It was named Elizabeth’s nursery for children after name of wife of the sugar factory owner at that time, Filip Schoeller. The nursery was abolished around 1933 and in September 1949 the town purchased the building. In front of the town hall in a park modified area, there is standing a large memorial to the victims of World War I and II.

On the same side of the square as the town hall is there is standing a two-storied building of the Čakovice Grammar school no. 100. The most monumental building in the square is absolutely the Church of St Remigius. The present church in this place is the third in order. It was built during 1878-1881 according to design by builder Karel Scheiner as a pseudo-Romanesque building in the plan of cross, with tower 32 m high. In 1904 there was added a baptismal chapel according to design by arch. Kamil Hilbert.